February 8, 2019

Superintendent’s Office

BOARD AGENDA FEBRUARY 12, 2019

The Board agenda contains routine items in addition to the following items of special interest:

  • Anticipated litigation – Stanford University General Use Permit (GUP) Environmental Impact Report
  • Director of Certificated Human Resources Job Description – The job description is presented as routine business. We have discussed the position in several settings, including the Open Session portion of our Study Session.
  • 2017-18 School Accountability Report Card (SARC) – The reports are appearing for the second time for approval. The reports are on the consent calendar.
  • Progress Report on Development of the Cubberley Master Plan – We expect an extended conversation around the Cubberley conceptual project. Representatives from Concordia will share current thoughts and solicit input. The presentation is allotted 15 minutes and we expect comments and discussion.
  • Palo Alto Summer Programs – We will highlight our equity work through a quick look at our summer programs.
  • Governor’s Proposal on 2019-20 State Budget – Dr. Novak will highlight some key aspects of the State budget. Representatives from Capitol Advisors will join us at the following meeting for a deeper explanation of this item and other legislative areas of interest.
  • Information Items – A brief summary of the AP Capstone program and our first look at attendance are contained in the Information section of the agenda.

VISITS AND INSIGHTS

As promised the second half of the year is dedicated to meeting with more people and gathering feedback about our current state and future aspirations. These visits have led to some discoveries that will improve our work. This week included discussions with the staffs of Duveneck and Addison, PTA Council, Hoover PTA, Gunn HS Professional Learning Community (PLC), and the League of Women Voters. The PAUSD Promise can still be found online. The document is still a draft and will come back to a future meeting for additional discussion.

STANFORD GENERAL USE PERMIT (GUP)

Our team is meeting with representatives from Stanford University later this afternoon.  The publication of this report occurs before our meeting. Stanford was notified that we expect a substantive discussion about the items outlined in our Board Resolution.  

I plan to write our families directly very soon to provide information and context about the GUP and potential impact for PAUSD. Our local PTA is organized and ready to fully engage our community in this topic. Details about the proposed GUP can be found online.

The following Letter to the Editor was in the newspaper today:

by Teri Baldwin, Nancy Krop and Meb Steiner

Stanford University plans to build up to 2.275 million square feet of academic space and 3,150 housing units or beds by 2035. Weekly file photo.

Stanford University and Santa Clara County are now negotiating the next 17-year Stanford general use permit ("GUP"). Stanford's proposal is the largest land development application in County history.

Unless Stanford fully mitigates the impacts on Palo Alto schools of such massive development, PAUSD faces annual budget shortfalls in the millions of dollars, forcing increased classroom sizes, program reductions and staff layoffs.

In the new GUP, Stanford could add up to 1,445 new students to Palo Alto schools. To the extent Stanford builds tax-exempt rental properties for these students' families, PAUSD receives no property-tax revenues to cover the cost of educating the new students. Adding hundreds of students, without adding revenues, means irreparable harm to PAUSD schools.

We welcome every new student. All we ask is Stanford fully mitigate the impacts of any approved development.

Historically, Stanford and PAUSD worked together to accomplish their common goal of maintaining excellent PAUSD schools when Stanford added students living in Stanford tax-exempt rental homes.

Your voice is needed now. At the end of this column are quick and easy ways to message Stanford and the County to continue this long-term partnership and protect our schools.

Stanford's 100-Year financial partnership with PAUSD

As a valued partner of PAUSD, Stanford has

* Contributed $10 million to PAUSD in the last GUP (2000 GUP) for the cost of educating new Stanford students

* Paid about $460K annually for Stanford West residential property tax (covers 7 percent the cost of educating those students, according to PAUSD)

* Sold land to PAUSD — at full market value — for four schools when Stanford created neighborhoods

* Paid property taxes on its non-exempt commercial properties (less than $2 million a year, covering less than 10 percent the PAUSD cost of educating Stanford students living in tax-exempt rental housing, according to PAUSD)

Stanford's proposed GUP

Stanford proposes to build 550 tax-exempt rental homes on Quarry Road, generating 275 students. Because Stanford is exempt from paying property taxes on its rental properties, these students generate no property tax revenues to cover the cost of their education.

Stanford also proposes to develop 2,275,000 square feet of academic facilities. Estimates range up to 1,445 new students (generated by this new workforce), adding no property tax revenues if Stanford builds them tax-exempt rental homes.

PAUSD costs

PAUSD spends about $20,000 per student. The district currently absorbs $8 million annually to educate students living in tax-exempt Stanford-owned rental properties. When the GUP is approved, for the next 17 years, PAUSD will face annual additional budget shortages ranging from $5.5 million (275 new students) to $28 million plus (1,445 new students).

A PAUSD brief on the GUP states: "Adding hundreds of students with little or no additional property tax revenue would result in significant and permanent PAUSD budget shortfalls, class size increases, and program reductions which would irreparably damage the quality of education for all PAUSD students, including those coming from Stanford."

In addition to the GUP students, more students are coming to PAUSD. After 25 years of continuous growth, PAUSD enrollment declined about 4 percent over the past five years. Going forward, PAUSD anticipates increased enrollment as the city, county and state address our acute housing-to-jobs imbalance. The Palo Alto Comprehensive Plan sets a goal of at least 300 new housing units a year for the next 12 years.

Other private universities financially contribute to their local school districts. As Stanford did in the prior GUP, Stanford could contribute revenue for PAUSD to educate students living in Stanford tax-exempt rental homes.

New elementary school precedent

Stanford's proposed Quarry Road homes are miles from any PAUSD school site. Plus, almost 300 elementary school students currently live along the Sand Hill corridor, primarily at the Stanford West rental community. These nearly 500 Sand Hill/Quarry Road students live 2 to 5 miles from the nearest school.

Historically, when Stanford created a new neighborhood, PAUSD purchased Stanford land at full market value and built a school for the additional children. In 1958, when Stanford built Escondido Village, PAUSD built Escondido School across the street. When Stanford developed Frenchman's Hill in 1968, PAUSD built Nixon in the middle of the new neighborhood.

PAUSD identified 42 potential sites for a new elementary school on Stanford land. Stanford could sell land to PAUSD for a school for the 500 Sand Hill/Quarry Road students.

Common-interest solutions

Fortunately, PAUSD and Stanford share a common interest in Stanford fully mitigating its impacts, and have a history of working together to maintain excellent public schools.

To further our common interest in maintaining excellent schools, there are several ways Stanford and PAUSD can partner up. Possible full mitigation solutions include

* Stanford mitigating the annual PAUSD budget shortfalls via annual payments to PAUSD, based on the number of students residing in tax-exempt Stanford-rental properties

* Stanford selling a 4-acre parcel to PAUSD to build a neighborhood school

* Stanford mitigating the PAUSD cost of building the school

* Stanford mitigating the City Safe Routes to Schools costs

* Stanford allocating some new housing for PAUSD teachers and staff, many facing incredibly long commutes to serve our children

* Stanford funding the expansion of oversubscribed after-school childcare on PAUSD campuses for additional students

Be part of the solution

Your voice is needed. Speak up now and be part of the solution. Message the County and Stanford for full mitigation, necessary to protect PAUSD schools, teachers, staff and programs.

* iPhone users: speak up with a tap on your phone. Download the free Click My Cause Two-Tap App, select Palo Alto PTA Council, and tap on any "Act Now" button.

* Android users, sign a petition at clickmycause.com/2019/01/13/protect-pausd-schools

* Learn more at ptac.paloaltopta.org: Read the School Board Resolution, PAUSD Briefing Book, PTAC Fact Sheet, and Safe Routes to School Letter.

Nancy Krop is a PAUSD parent and advocacy consultant for the Palo Alto PTA Council and can be contacted at nancypta@kroplaw.com. Teri Baldwin is a teacher and the president of the Palo Alto Educators Association and can be contacted at tbaldwin@pausd.org. Meb Steiner is a special education instructional aide and president of California School Employees Association Palo Alto Chapter 301 and can be contacted at mrsteiner@pausd.org.

Department of Research, Evaluation, and Assessment

SCHOOL ACCOUNTABILITY REPORT CARD

Every school in California is required by state law to publish a School Accountability Report Card (SARC) by February 1. The SARC contains information about the condition and performance of each California public school. PAUSD’s SARCs are now available online through the CDE Find a SARC webpage or the PAUSD Schools webpage. In addition, each school site’s front office has a hard-copy of the SARC for parents to view. For more information visit the Parent’s Guide to the SARC.

Education Services

SCIENCE, TECHNOLOGY, ENGINEERING, ARTS, AND MATH (STEAM) INQUIRY GROUP

The STEAM Inquiry Group met on Monday, February 4, to focus on the Disciplinary Core Idea learning progressions and preview the newly State approved science curriculums. The group explored the new science materials approved by California for adoption consideration. Next year, elementary education will begin the formal science textbook adoption process.

SOUTH BAY COLLABORATIVE TRAINING ON SCIENCE ADOPTION TOOLKIT

On Tuesday, February 5, Elementary TOSAs attended the South Bay Collaborative Professional Learning Day. They practiced using the CA Science Adoption Toolkit and planned for their upcoming intra-district teacher professional development day called Engineering Extravaganza 2.0.

CALCULUS: CORE TOPICS OF INTRODUCTION TO ANALYSIS & CALCULUS (IAC) – *NEW* SUMMER COURSE

This new high school summer school course is a bridge to calculus that provides strong 11th grade students in the Algebra 2/Trigonometry A course, the needed background to matriculate to Advanced Placement (AP) Calculus AB and take advanced calculus courses in college. Core Topics of IAC covers Laws of Sines and Cosines, DeMoivre's Theorem, Sequences & Series, 2-D and 3-D vectors, basic graphing in 3-D, matrices (basic operations, solving systems, transformations, on technology), Probability & Counting, Parametric Equations, Polar Coordinates & Functions, and an Introduction to Limit Theory. 

This challenging course meets for five hours per day for three weeks, with three hours of daily homework anticipated. Students should expect to score in the B or better range on tests and quizzes in order to feel fully prepared for AP Calculus AB in the upcoming school year. This course earns no credit, is not graded, and isopen only to rising 12th grade students. It will be offered in Session I of Summer School. Sign-ups for summer school courses begin in early March.

GOVERNMENT AND WORLD HISTORY/CONTEMPORARY WORLD HISTORY MATERIALS ADOPTION COMMITTEE UPDATE

High school History-Social Studies Textbook and Materials Adoption Work continues among the Gunn and Paly teachers, students, and parent on the committee. The materials under consideration for the Government, World History, and Contemporary World History courses are on display at the District Office. Conversations around the materials include alignment with standards, quality and depth of assessment, universal access of the concepts, support materials, and the representation of diverse voices. Readability, ancillary supports, and investigations are considered as well. The public is welcome to review and share insights of the materials at the District Office. Public input is taken to the committees and discussed.

MENTOR/STUDENT FORUMS

The Advanced Authentic Research (AAR) Mentor/Student Forums are a series of events that the AAR team hosts at Gunn and Paly throughout the year to give mentors and students an opportunity to work together in a structured environment. This past Tuesday, February 5, students collaborated with their mentors to discuss their data collection processes, challenges they have encountered, analyze results to begin drawing conclusions, and plan their research presentations for the Celebratory Showcase in May. 

SUPPORTING THE EXPANSION OF A PAUSD PROGRAM

Laguna Beach Unified School District plans to implement the AAR program at their high school in the 2019-20 academic year. The Innovation and Agility Department is helping to provide guidance and curriculum materials to Laguna Beach as well as working with their newly appointed AAR Coordinator during the planning phase.

PHYSICAL FITNESS TESTING (PFT)

The State Board of Education designated the FITNESSGRAM as the PFT for students in California public schools in 5th, 7th, and 9th grades. The FITNESSGRAM is a comprehensive, health-related physical fitness battery developed by The Cooper Institute. The primary goal of the FITNESSGRAM is to assist students in establishing lifetime habits of regular physical activity. 

The FITNESSGRAM  is composed of the following six fitness areas, with a number of test options provided for most areas: Aerobic Capacity, Abdominal Strength and Endurance, Upper Body Strength and Endurance, Body Composition, Trunk Extensor Strength and Flexibility, and Flexibility. There are a number of test options available for each fitness area, for more information visit the California Department of Education (CDE) page.

The Cooper Institute established these criteria using current research and expert opinions. These criteria represent a level of fitness that offers some protection against the diseases associated with physical inactivity.

The tables below display the percentage of students meeting the Healthy Fitness Zone (HFZ) in each of the six fitness areas for three cohorts of students, for the indicated years and grade levels.

Year

Grade

n size

Aerobic Capacity

Body Comp.

Abdominal Strength

Trunk Extension Strength

Upper Body Strength

Flexibility

2013

5th

944

90%

78%

83%

88%

81%

82%

2015

7th

945

86%

79%

86%

77%

67%

92%

2017

9th

940

83%

84%

93%

84%

74%

93%

Year

Grade

n size

Aerobic Capacity

Body Comp.

Abdominal Strength

Trunk Extension Strength

Upper Body Strength

Flexibility

2014

5th

1001

88%

82%

85%

92%

82%

81%

2016

7th

1016

87%

79%

88%

77%

67%

94%

2018

9th

1017

83%

82%

91%

87%

74%

92%*

Year

Grade

n size

Aerobic Capacity

Body Comp.

Abdominal Strength

Trunk Extension Strength

Upper Body Strength

Flexibility

2016

5th

1050

91%

82%

86%

89%

78%

80%

2018

7th

1021

86%

81%

86%

81%

64%

94%*

*PAUSD's PFT vendor incorrectly reported 2018 Flexibility Fitness Area results to the CDE. These tables reflect accurate student results.

Strategic Initiatives and Operations

NATIONAL SCHOOL COUNSELING WEEK

This week is National School Counseling Week, “School Counselors: Providing Lessons for Life.” National School Counseling Week, sponsored by American School Counselor Association (ASCA), highlights the tremendous impact school counselors can have in helping students achieve school success and plan for a career. School counselors work to enhance students’ social/personal, educational and career development by working with parents, teachers, and other educators to provide an educational system where students can realize their potential and set healthy, realistic, and optimistic aspirations for themselves. Professional school counselors are certified experienced educators with a master’s degree in guidance and counseling. The combination of their training and experience makes counselors an integral part of the total educational program. Please join us in recognizing our school counselors.

HeArt AT GUNN HIGH SCHOOL

CASSY therapists at Gunn have started an art therapy group on Tuesdays in the Wellness Center during Flex. Students participate in a no pressure, relaxing art activity with their peers. Each week there is a new theme. The group is called HeArt and Wellness. They are open to all students on campus and take the first 8 -10 students who sign up each week. Students are welcome to come regularly or for one session. The group will have safety norms set up for members and students will have the option to share more about their work at the end of each session.

SafeTALK AT PALY

Paly’s Wellness Center is sponsoring an opportunity for staff members to take SafeTALK, a half-day suicide alertness training. Wellness Leadership partnered with County Behavioral Health Department to offer this training free of cost. The training will run during the Professional Learning Day on Thursday, February 14, from 8:45 a.m. - 11:45 a.m. and will be held at Paly, but is open to all staff. Members interested in attending should email Paly’s Wellness Outreach Worker Angelina Michael. Participants will be asked for their feedback on this experiential training to determine if the Wellness & Support Services should offer more SafeTALK trainings for staff in the future.

Over the course of their training, safeTALK participants will learn to:

  • Notice and respond to situations where suicidal thoughts may be present
  • Recognize that invitations for help are often overlooked
  • Move beyond the common tendency to miss, dismiss, and avoid suicide
  • Apply the TALK steps: Tell, Ask, Listen, and KeepSafe
  • Know community resources and how to connect someone with thoughts of suicide to them for further help
  • Hands-on skills practice and development

HEALTH TECHNICIAN PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

The District Nurses held the monthly Health Technicians Meeting on Thursday, February 7. Health Technicians are licensed nurses, either LVN or RN, working in the health offices at the five secondary sites. This month’s meeting featured professional development on rash identification and procedures. The Nurses collaborated to ensure consistent processes across the secondary sites on exposure notices and exclusion protocols in alignment with the Public Health Department guidelines. Future professional development will include bringing back information from the California School Nurse Organization annual conference.

BEHAVIOR TRAINING WITH THE TRANSPORTATION TEAM

During yesterday's training with the Transportation team the main points revolved around:

  • Principle of least restrictive environment (often pertaining to questions from drivers around why students cannot be more restrained on buses or taken off the larger buses)
  • Transportation as an IEP service and a guaranteed service offered to certain students
  • We heavily encouraged communication with the transportation and the behavior teams
  • Explained the significance of their documentation in the process of intervening with students on the bus
  • Discussed the differences between disruptive and dangerous behaviors and what the likely responses would look like to complaints of the two
  • We encouraged bus drivers to openly communicate and ask for assistance from Instructional Assistants (IA's) or teachers in helping student get on the bus safely, as some staff do not want people to step on the bus and IA's have said they are uncomfortable doing so

We then opened up to specific questions that generally revolved around interaction with parents and specific safety concerns. A small training along the lines of safety care chapter 4 (bite prevention, dealing with hair pulls, clothing grabs, etc.) was offered. Most drivers said they were absolutely interested in such a training.

Technology Department

DIGITAL DRIVER’S LICENSE UPDATES

The middle school digital citizenship teacher team continues to refine the “Digital Driver’s License” that started at all three middle schools this school year. The Digital Driver’s License allows our middle school students to demonstrate their basic understanding of digital citizenship while earning a badge in Schoology. The team recently reviewed the newly updated digital citizenship lessons available to teachers through Common Sense Education, a national nonprofit organization supporting safe technology use for students and families. The new content was used to update the Digital Driver’s License assessment questions available to students through Schoology. Next steps for the team include considering how to make more digital citizenship content available to students over the summer for self-paced learning and exploration.

NEW STUDENT ENROLLMENTS - DIGITAL WORKFLOW

The Registration Services team has scanned, indexed, and filed over 22,000 pages of documents into approximately 1,300 folders associated with new student registrations in the past month. These folders are electronic now, but in previous years would have been taking up space in boxes before being processed and then delivered to school sites in the form of cumulative files. Another huge kudos to the Registration Services Team for their efforts and willingness to embrace process change for improved District Office operations.